Control Theory and Application
ASHRAE Technical Committee 1.4

Meeting Documents

Download documents from previous committee meetings below according to the appropriate society year. ASHRAE's society year begins on July 1 and ends June 30.

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15


Research

ASHRAE members have free access to research project final reports. Non-ASHRAE members can purchase these research reports for $30 per article from the ASHRAE On-line BookStore found at this link

The following TC 1.4 projects have been recently completed.

1455-RP: Advanced Control Systems for HVAC Systems – Phase 1 Air Distribution and Terminal Systems: This research project is intended to be the first of two phases: Phase I: Air Distribution and Terminal Systems and Phase II: Central Plants and Hydronic Systems. This first phase will include developing comprehensive optimized control sequences for the following common air distribution and terminal subsystems: Generic thermal zones, Single zone systems, Variable air volume terminal units, and Variable air volume systems. Logic diagrams will be developed for the sequences so that the logic is not vague, as is inherent in any written sequence. Sequences will be tested and debugged using simulation. Future research projects will be implemented to test the sequences in real buildings.
Once the research project is complete, the sequences and flow diagrams will be proposed as appendices to Guideline 13 via the addenda process. This will allow them to be publicly reviewed. Including the sequences in Guideline 13 will also allow them to be maintained over time, such as fixing bugs and incorporating new energy saving or diagnostic sequences via addenda, and also provides a good way for them to be disseminated − control sequences and control specifications go hand in hand.

1597-RP: Stochastic Control Optimization of Mixed-Mode Buildings: The primary purpose of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems is to provide acceptable indoor air quality and thermal comfort. Mixed-mode ventilation systems provide good indoor air quality and thermal climate using natural ventilation whenever the outdoor weather conditions are favorable, but revert to mechanical systems for HVAC whenever external conditions are too harsh. A mixed-mode building should switch between these two modes of operation according to seasonal and diurnal variations in the indoor thermal conditions and the outdoor environment. Such a building requires an intelligent control system that can switch automatically between natural and mechanical modes in such a way that minimizes energy consumption without compromising indoor air quality or the thermal comfort of its occupants.

Presentations